Randomness and Meaning

The impossibility of the Chinese Room has implications across the board for understanding what meaning means. Mark Walker’s paper “On the Intertranslatability of all Natural Languages” describes how the translation of words and phrases may be achieved:

  1. Through a simple correspondence scheme (word for word)
  2. Through “syntactic” expansion of the languages to accommodate concepts that have no obvious equivalence (“optometrist” => “doctor for eye problems”, etc.)
  3. Through incorporation of foreign words and phrases as “loan words”
  4. Through “semantic” expansion where the foreign word is defined through its coherence within a larger knowledge network.

An example for (4) is the word “lepton” where many languages do not have a corresponding concept and, in fact, the concept is dependent on a bulwark of advanced concepts from particle physics. There may be no way to create a superposition of the meanings of other words using (2) to adequately handle “lepton.”

These problems present again for trying to understand how children acquire meaning in learning a language. As Walker points out, language learning for a second language must involve the same kinds of steps as learning translations, so any simple correspondence theory has to be supplemented.

So how do we make adequate judgments about meanings and so rapidly learn words, often initially with a course granularity but later with increasingly sharp levels of focus? What procedure is required for expanding correspondence theories to operate in larger networks? Methods like Latent Semantic Analysis and Random Indexing show how this can be achieved in ways that are illuminating about human cognition. In each case, the methods provide insights into how relatively simple transformations of terms and their occurrence contexts can be viewed as providing a form of “triangulation” about the meaning of words. And, importantly, this level of triangulation is sufficient for these methods to do very human-like things. Both methods can pass the TOEFL exam, for instance, and Latent Semantic Analysis is at the heart of automatic essay grading approaches that have sufficiently high success rates that they are widely used by standardized test makers.

How do they work? I’ll just briefly describe Random Indexing, since I recently presented the concept at the Big Data Science meetup at SGI in Fremont, California. In Random Indexing, we simply create a randomized sparse vector for each word we encounter in a large collection of texts. The vector can be binary as a first approximation, so something like:

The: 0000000000000100000010000000000000000001000000000000000…

quick: 000100000000000010000000000001000000000110000000000000…

fox: 0000000000000000000000100000000000000000000000000100100…

Now, as I encountered a given word in the text, I just add up the random vectors for the words around it to create a new “context” vector that is still sparse, but less so than the component parts. What is interesting about this approach is that if you consider the vectors as representing points in a hyperspace with the same dimensionality as the vectors are long, then words that have similar meanings tend to cluster in that space. Latent Semantic Analysis achieves a similar clustering using some rather complex linear algebra. A simple approximation of the LSA approach is also at the heart of Google’s PageRank algorithm, though operating on link structure rather than word co-occurrences.

So how do we solve the TOEFL test using an approach like Random Indexing? A large collection of texts are analyzed to create a Random Index, then for a sample question like:

In line 5, the word “pronounced” most closely means

  1. evident
  2. spoken
  3. described
  4. unfortunate

The question and the question text are converted into a context vector using the same random vectors for the index and then the answers vectors are compared to see which is closest in the index space. This is remarkably inexpensive to compute, requiring just an inner product between the context vectors for question and answer.

A method for compact coding using Algorithmic Information Theory can also be used to achieve similar results, demonstrating the wide applicability of context-based analysis to helping understand how intertranslateability and language learning are dependent on the rich contexts of word usage.

One comment

Post a comment

You may use the following HTML:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>